News Archive

Tools for Fools

Jul 30, 2015

 

Today, we released the Tools for Fools research report. Tools for Fools looks at Enterprise Project and Portfolio Management Solutions (EPPMS).  Tools for Fools report is an advanced thinking research report.  The purpose of this report is to present five years of research on the value of EPPMS.  In this report we consider if EPPMS increases the value of project investments. In this report we consider if EPPMS increases customer satisfaction of your project investments.  In this report we consider if EPPMS increases project success rates.  In this report we consider if EPPMS cut average project costs. Finally, in this report we consider if EPPM solutions provide a clearer picture of project progress. This report has been greatly influenced by mining the current CHAOS database, which has more than 50,000 project profiles and users of EPPMS.

This is outline of the report:

Page 1: Introduction: is where we introduce and answer the major questions. On this page we have two tables, Table one is survey results of 300 IT executives whose organizations use EPPMS. They were asked how valuable they found the solution. Table two shows the success rates of projects from the CHAOS Database that used EPPMS vs. those that did not. 

Page 2: Considers the resource management feature of EPPMS. On this page we have two tables.  Table three is survey results of 300 IT executives whose organizations use EPPM solutions. They were asked if the resource management function had an effect on project success. Table four is CHAOS Database results on the value of projects that used EPPM tools vs. those that did not.

Page 3: Considers the project portfolio management and demand management features. On this page we have two tables. Table five is the Survey results of 300 IT executives whose organizations use EPPM solutions. The question asked if using the portfolio management function had an effect on project investments. Table six is CHAOS Database results on the satisfaction of projects that used EPPM solutions vs. those that did not.

Page 4: Provides the summary and conclusion. Table 7 provides a checklist of benefits for EPPMS. The Tools for Fools Report is available to members in our report sections of our website Dashboard. Non-members can sign up in our store.

 

 

 

Factors of Value

Jun 29, 2015

Today, we released the “Factors of Value,” an advanced thinking research report.  The idea of this report is to define and explain the Factors of Value. In addition, we provide investment guidance and compare the value factors against the success factors. This report has been greatly influenced by mining the current CHAOS database, which has more than 50,000 project profiles.

This is outline of the report:

Page 1: Introduction: is where we introduce the ten factors of value and the mainline story.  On this page we have two tables: Ten Factors of Success and Factors of Value.  The two tables show and compare the Factors of Success versus the Factors of Value. It is Standish tradition to assign points to each factor to highlight its relevance. These points should also be considered as an investment guideline for improvement.

Page 2: Factors 1 and 2: are defined on this page and we continue with the mainline story.  The one table presents the value of projects in the CHAOS database in relation to the size of the project.

Page 3: Factors 3 and 4: are defined on this page and we continue with the mainline story. The one table presents the value of projects in the CHAOS database in relation to the skill level of the executive sponsor.

Page 4: Factors 5 and 6: are defined on this page and we continue with the mainline story. The one table presents the value of projects in the CHAOS database in relation to the process methodology.

Page 5: Factors 7 and 8: are defined on this page and we continue with the mainline story. The one table presents the value of projects in the CHAOS database in relation to the user participation skills.

Page 6: Factors 9 and 10: are defined on this page and we continue with the mainline story. The one table presents the value of projects in the CHAOS database in relation to staff skill level.

Page 7: Summary: Completes the main storyline and sums up the report. The one table presents the compares success and value.

The new Factors of Value Report is available to members in our report sections of our website Dashboard. Non-members can join in our store.

 

Stanmets

Jun 22, 2015

It has been twenty years in the making. The Standish Group found that common measurements such as thousand lines of code (KLOCS) and function points (FPS) were neither consistent across organizations nor fully descriptive to form true normalization for effective cross organization or project comparatives.  In addition, sometime there is no code. For example, packages are purchased off-the-shelf.  Other times there is a mix of components and development. Yet, these projects are included in the CHAOS database and need to be measured in a consistent fashion to be able to truly gauge their effectiveness. Therefore The Standish Group has created a new normalization metric called Stanmets. Stanmets is shorthand for Standish Metrics. Read more  

CHAOS Manifesto 2015: The Law of Diminishing Returns

May 27, 2015

Today, we released the “CHAOS Manifesto 2015: The Law of Diminishing Returns is an advanced thinking research report.  The CHAOS Manifesto report should not be confused with the CHAOS Report, which has statistics on project success and failure that we released last month. This CHAOS Manifesto report has 10 broad theories, each with three concepts aimed at mitigating the law of diminishing returns. The idea of this report is not to set rules and guidelines, but to question the common wisdom of the project management process without regard to the return on value of these processes. This report has been greatly influenced by mining the current CHAOS database, which has more than 50,000 project profiles. This is outline of the report:

Page 1: Introduction: is where we introduce the ten broad theories.  On this page we have a table with the ten broad theories and their three concepts.  In addition 3 pie charts: The five-year average for Traditional Resolution of all software projects from FY2011–2015 within the CHAOS database; the five-year average for Modern Resolution of all software projects; and the five-year average for Value-Satisfaction Resolution of all software projects.

Page 2:  We have our first theory with the three concepts.  One table showing the OnTime, OnBudget, and OnTarget for traditional challenged projects by either percentage overrun or feature deficiency.

Page 3:  We have our second theory with the three concepts. One pie chart showing the percentage of organizations that do regular value assessments before starting a project.

Page 4:  We have our third theory with the three concepts. One table showing the value of projects in the CHAOS database in relationship to the project’s complexity.

Page 5:  We have our fourth theory with the three concepts. One table that represents The Standish Group’s opinion of the value of features and functions over the age of the application. As the application ages, the value of the features and functions used decreases.

Page 6:  We have our fifth theory with the three concepts. One table that shows the value of projects in the CHAOS database in relationship to their closeness to the organization’s strategic goal.

Page 7:  We have our sixth theory with the three concepts.  A graphic showing the relationship of project waste to value.

Page 8:  We have our seventh theory with the three concepts.  One table showing the value of projects in the CHAOS database in relationship to the organization’s optimization skills.

Page 9:  We have our  eighth theory with the three concepts.  One table showing how organizations carry out regular value assessments of completed projects.

Page 10:  We have our ninth theory with the three concepts.  One pie chart showing who controls the enterprise architecture.

Page 11:  We have our tenth theory with the three concepts. No charts or tables.  Advertisement for The Standish Group’s Resolution Benchmark. 

Page 12:  Is the summary of the theories and concepts outlined in the CHAOS Manifesto 2015 to reduce project management costs and improve the return of project investments.  One table that represents our opinion of the major benefits from each of the 10 theories. 

The new CHAOS Manifesto 2015: The Law of Diminishing Returns is available to members in our report sections of our website Dashboard. Non-members can join in our store.

 

 

CHAOS Report 2015

Apr 21, 2015

Today, we released the “CHAOS Report 2015” report. The CHAOS Report 2015 is a model for future CHAOS Reports. There have only been two previous CHAOS Reports, the original in 1994 and the 21st edition of 2014. This new type of CHAOS Report focuses on presenting the data in different forms with many charts. Most of the charts come from the new CHAOS database from the fiscal years 2011 to 2015. The CHAOS fiscal year starts March 1 and runs until the end of February. A few of the charts are from the new SURF database to highlight certain information. The purpose of this report is to present the data in the purest form without much analysis and little thought leadership. Analysis and thought leadership are offered in the CHAOS Manifesto series of reports.  This is outline of the report:

Page 1: Introduction: where we introduce the six data points of success.  On this page we display 3 pie charts and one table: OnBudget, OnTime OnTarget and Traditional Resolution for All Projects.

Page 2: Modern Resolution is defined as OnTime, OnBudget, with a satisfactory result. On this page we display 3 pie charts and one table: Valuable, OnGoal, Satisfactory and Modern Resolution for All Projects.

Page 3: Project Size: has always been a major element in the CHAOS research. On this page we display 2 pie charts and 2 tables: Value for Large Projects, Value for Small Projects, Project Size by CHAOS Resolution and CHAOS Resolution by Project Size.

Page 4:  Resolution by Industry: provides another view of the CHAOS database. On this page we display 2 pie charts and one table: satisfaction level for banking projects, satisfaction level for retail projects and CHAOS Resolution by Industry.

Page 5: Areas of the World shows project resolution of the 4 major geographical areas of the world. On this page we display 2 pie charts and one table: Budget Process, Project Selection Process, and CHAOS Resolution by each Area of the World.

Page 6: Project Type: has a major effect on resolution. On this page we display 2 pie charts and one table: ROI for Requirements, Gain versus Risk Metrics, and CHAOS Resolution by Project Type.

Page 7: Agile versus Waterfall: compares the resolution of all software projects segmented by the agile process and waterfall method by size. On this page we display a pie chart and one table: Time Boxes and CHAOS Resolution by Agile versus Waterfall.

Page 8: Complexity: discusses how we determine and appraise complexity. On this page we display 2 pie charts and one table: Complexity Appraisal, Large, Complex Projects, and CHAOS Resolution by Complexity.

Page 9: Goal: as one of the seven constraints. On this page we display 2 pie charts and one table: Low-Value Business Processes, Cost/Benefit Analysis, and CHAOS Resolution by Goal.

Page 10: Skilled Staff: is a look at project resolution by capability. On this page we display 2 pie charts and one table: Gifted Agile Teams, Unskilled Agile Teams, and CHAOS Resolution by Capability.

Page 11: Factors of Success: reflects our opinion of the importance of each attribute and our recommendation of the amount of effort and investment that should be considered to improve project success. On this page we display a table of 2015 CHAOS Factors of Success with investment recommendation.

Page 12: shows additional resources and research and Resolution Benchmark benefits.

The new CHAOS report: 2015 Edition is available to members in our report sections of our website dashboard. Non-members can join in our store.

New CHAOS 2015 CHARTS

Mar 18, 2015

The Standish Group has replaced and updated the primary 12 CHAOS Charts in the chart section with the following charts. All the charts are from the new CHAOS Database from fiscal years 2011 to 2015.  Fiscal year runs from March 1st to the end of February of the following year. Unless otherwise noted the total number of software projects is over 25,000 with an average of 5,000 per yearly period.  In addition, all charts, except for the first chart, use our modern definition of success. Modern Resolution is defined as OnTime, OnBudget with a satisfactory result.

Chart 1: Traditional Resolution for All Projects

Traditional Resolution is defined as OnTime, OnBudget and OnTarget.

Chart 2: Modern Resolution for All Projects

Modern Resolution is defined as OnTime, OnBudget with a satisfactory result.

Chart 3: Project Size by CHAOS Resolution

The chart shows the size of the software projects by the modern resolution definition.

Chart 4: CHAOS Resolution by Project Size

The chart shows the resolution of all software projects by size.

Chart 5: CHAOS Resolution by Industry

The chart shows the resolution of all software projects by industry.

Chart 6: CHAOS Resolution by Project Type

The chart shows the resolution of all software projects by project type. Project type is the development method used to create the application or system.

Chart 7: CHAOS Resolution by Agile versus Waterfall

The chart compares the resolution of all software projects from Fiscal 2011 to 2015 within the new CHAOS database is segmented by the agile process and waterfall method.  The Standish Group took great care to code each project by true agile and true waterfall. The total number of software projects in these two segments is over 10,000.

Chart 8: CHAOS Resolution by Area of the World

The chart shows the resolution of all software projects by the four major areas of the world. 

Chart 9: CHAOS Resolution by Complexity

The chart shows the resolution of all software projects by complexity.

Chart 10: CHAOS Resolution by Goal

The chart shows the resolution of all software projects by goal.

Chart 11: CHAOS Resolution by Capability

The chart shows the resolution of all software projects by capability.

Chart 12: 2015 CHAOS Factors of Success

Chart shows the 2015 Factors of Success.  This chart reflects our opinion of the importance of each attribute and our recommendation of the amount of effort and investment that should be considered to improve project success.

CHAOS Members just need to click the chart icon on the membership dashboard to review the information.  Not  member check out our membership: http://www.standishgroup.com/Membership

 

Modernization in Place

Feb 26, 2015

Today we are pleased to announce that we have released The Standish Group’s Modernization in Place Report. Modernization in Place report recommends ways to modernize and update critical applications.  A highlight of the Modernization in Place report is the use rate and value of features and functions by the age of the application.  The Modernization in Place report suggests a concrete path to a successful resolution of a modernization project.  Modernization in Place report outlines the six steps to a successful completion of a modernization project. The Modernization in Place Report is 6 pages:

Page 1:  Introduction outlines the concept of modernizing applications while they are fully functional and in use.  On page one we introduce the six steps of modernization and how to prepare for modernization. There is one chart on page one and the title is “Percentage of features and functions by frequency use".  This table represents The Standish Group’s opinion of how frequently features and functions are used over the age of the application.

Page 2:  Introduces the concept of Crapola and how it affects modernization in place efforts.  On this page we also discuss the laws of Manny Lehman. There is one chart on page two and the title is “Percent of Features and Functions by Value. This table represents The Standish Group’s opinion of the value of features and functions over the age of the application.

Page 3: Presents and explains the first three steps in the six steps of Modernization. There is one chart on page three and the title is Satisfaction by Type of Project. This table represents the level of satisfaction of projects by types from the CHAOS database, covering projects from 2010 to 2014.

Page 4: Presents and explains the last three steps in the six steps of Modernization. There is one chart on page four and the title is Skill Levels of Successful Modernization Projects. This table represents the skill levels of successful modernization projects, measured by on time, on budget, and with a satisfactory outcome, from fiscal 2010 to 2014.

Page 5: Presents and explains the benefits of modernizing critical older applications.  We also discuss the risks of not modernizing them. There is one chart on page five and the title CHAOS Resolution by Project Type. This table represents the project resolutions by type, measured by on time, on budget, and with a satisfactory outcome, from fiscal 2010 to 2014.

Page 6: Recommendation on additional research and resources.

Members can find this report in the reports section of the dashboard.  Non-members must join to read this report. 

 

Dragon2Dragon

Feb 13, 2015

“Dragon2Dragon” is a special story for Saint Valentine’s Day. Saint Valentine’s Day celebrates love and is a day dedicated for lovers. Dragon2Dragon is a love story and it is our gift to lovers.  Lovers around the world can rejoice in the knowledge that love conquers all hardships.  For the wantabe lover the lesson is there is a mate for everyone. Dragon2Dragon is also our gift to the children of world.  Dragon2Dragon is written as a children’s story. In Dragon2Dragon we explore:

  • Three basic physics lessons
  • Perseverance pays off
  • There is a friend for everyone
  • Opposites are attracted to each other
  • Being different is not the end of the world

You can:

Read on: Cafe CHAOS

Listen on: CHAOS Tuesday

View on: YouTube

 

Dragon2Dragon was written by Jim Johnson

Mike Johnson created the illustrations

Jennifer Drake Ford narrates Dragon2Dragon

Colleen Frye and Jim Crear edited the story

Joe Piccione did the video, audio, editing & production

Music from Shutterstock.com

 

Factors of Success

Feb 2, 2015

Today we are pleased to announce that have released the Standish Group Factors of Success 2015 report.  The report is 8 pages:

Page 1:  Introduction: outlines the paper and the methodology of developing the factors of success.  It also discusses the traditional definition of success and our new modern definition of success.  The table on this page depicts both versions of CHAOS project resolutions, successful, challenged and failed from fiscal 2010 to 2014.

Page 2:  Traditional success presents the Factors of Success for successful projects as measured by the PMI traditional definition of success on time, on budget and on target.   Page 2 table shows the skill levels of 10 Factors of Success by their score and rank.

Page 3:  Modern Success presents the Factors of Success for successful as measured by the Standish modern definition of success on time, on budget with a satisfactory result. Page 3 table shows the skill levels of10 Factors of Success by their score and rank.

Page 4:  Challenged presents the Factors of Success for challenged as measured by the Standish modern definition of late, over budget with an unsatisfactory result.   Page 4 table shows the skill levels of 10 Factors of Success by their score and rank.

Page 5:  Failed presents the Factors of Success for failed as measured by canceled or not used. Page 5 table shows the 10 Factors of Success by their score and rank.

Page 6: Trump Cards presents a discussion on attributes that create a project winning hand, Page 6 table is skill levels of agile teams by project resolution as calculated from the modern success metrics, from fiscal 2010 to 2014.

Page 7: Moderation presents the 2015 Factors of Success as reflected by our opinion of the importance of each attribute and our recommendation of the amount of effort and investment that should be considered to improve project success. Page 7 table presents the latest point values and investment considerations.

Page 8: Recommendation on additional research and resources.

Members can find this report in the reports section of the dashboard.  Non-members must join to read this report. 

 

Haze Project

Jan 12, 2015

The Standish Group is launching a new initiative called the “Haze” project.   The Haze Project starts with a series of reports and posts.  The next steps are workshops to dig down deeper to find real solutions that will provide value to government software projects.  The current activities can be found on the Haze webpage: http://www.standishgroup.com/haze

These activities and reports include:

Haze in Thinking: is a blog post three papers of government projects. 

Haze report adds value to “Rethinking the Public Spending on ICT projects” report.  The report considers the current state of software developed and innovation as a comparison to the current state of government projects.

Rethinking the Public Spending on ICT projects report was written by Hans Mulder and Ilias Kontakos.  The focus of this serious report is a commentary on the findings of the Dutch temporary committee on government ICT projects.

Conclusions and recommendations of the Dutch temporary committee on government ICT projects.

 If you have any questions or wish to provide feedback, please contact us using the Tell Me form on our website. 

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