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Jennifer Lynch

Jennifer Lynch is Communication Manager for The Standish Group. Jennifer’s expertise is to create and execute an industry, press and customer communications strategy designed to increase the visibility and awareness of The Standish Group, its products, services, and corporate citizenship initiatives.

Advice Articles

A Team of Your Own

 Jennifer Lynch suggests you read latest Café CHAOS Post, A Team of Your Own.

Acceptance

Jennifer Lynch suggests that poorly accepted feedback can undermine velocity and cause delays.

Bad News Travel Fast

Jennifer Lynch suggests you make bad news travel fast

Beyond the Goal

Jennifer Lynch quotes the first principle of economics is a scarcity of resources against unlimited wants.

Blink

Jennifer Lynch suggests that Malcolm Gladwell book titled Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking confirms our...

Brainstorming

Jennifer Lynch suggests brainstorming is one of the fastest and easiest ways to bring a team together. 

Butterfly Effect

Jennifer Lynch suggest you consider the butterfly effect.

Butterfly Effect on Business value

Jennifer Lynch suggests you consider how the project will change the business, such as increased sales, reduced cost and improved process efficiency.

Butterfly Effect on Executive Sponsorship

Jennifer Lynch suggests you consider executive sponsorship time.

CHAOS2020: Beyond Infinity Report

Jennifer Lynch suggest you review CHAOS2020: Beyond Infinity Report and provide feedback.

Chemistry

Jennifer Lynch suggests chemistry is hard to define, never mind manage.

Chewable Chunks

Jennifer Lynch suggests doing it chewable-chunks.

Clarity

Jennifer Lynch suggests clarity in mission will reduce turnover.

Communication Platform

Jennifer Lynch suggests you create a common and easy-to-use communication platform.

Contingency

Jennifer Lynch suggests having a contingency plan to fight arrogance.

Dynamic Leadership

Jennifer Lynch suggests dynamic leadership is the common structure of Hot Group 

Embrace Uncertainty

Jennifer Lynch suggests you embrace uncertainty using milestones.

ERPU Scenario #1: Big Bang Boom

The results of the Success Ladder Benchmark for the University project with the large, big bang approach show a 1% likelihood of success looking at the top line.  

ERPU Scenario #2: The Good Team

In scenario #2 we upgraded the team to mature, this increase the caused the likelihood of success to go up to 5% on the top line.

ERPU Scenario #3: The Good Sponsor

In Scenario #3 we upgraded the sponsor to highly mature.

ERPU Scenario #4: Small Slam Shine

In Scenario #4 we changed the project size from Grand to Moderate.

ERPU Scenario #5: Infinite Flow

Scenario #5: Infinite Flow is a non-project approach to developing, implementing, and sustaining mission-critical application software.

Ethical Training

Jennifer Lynch suggests management should provide ethical guidance.

Explicate

Jennifer Lynch suggests being explicate helps promote togetherness. 

In Search of the Obvious

Jennifer Lynch suggests that Search of the Obvious is a key practice of Infinite Flow.

Issue Timing

Jennifer Lynch suggests timing is the second most important issue item.

Just Say No

Jennifer Lynch suggests saying no is the hardest lesson for many project managers.

Just Say Yes

Jennifer Lynch suggests saying yes leads project resources and bring those resources together.

Keeping Promises

Jennifer Lynch suggests keeping promises shows respect.

Match

Jennifer Lynch suggests that you match the skills of the team correspond with the needed skills of the project.

Measurements

Jennifer Lynch suggests measurements are a key to helping the executive sponsor succeed.

New Advice Posts will Resume

New advice posts will resume on September 2nd.

Pairing

Jennifer Lynch suggests that pairing promotes togetherness. 

Public Execution

Jennifer Lynch suggests whether it is on purpose or just misguided judgment, fraudulence is a cancer and must be rooted out.

Rank

Jennifer Lynch suggests you take the yield rating and putting them in order from highest to lowest yield. 

Real-time View

Jennifer Lynch real-time view is already an available resource.

Remove and Replace

Jennifer Lynch suggests you remove and replace non-participating stakeholder.

Retrospective Explicit

Jennifer Lynch suggests the ideas and recommendations that come out of a retrospective must be well defined.

Retrospectives

Jennifer Lynch suggests retrospectives.

Rumor Control

Jennifer Lynch suggests you consider how to deal with rumors, in particular bad ones.

Simple Dezider

Our Simple Dezider promotes greater participation with better and faster project decisions.

Sponsorship

Jennifer Lynch suggests nothing succeeds like success.

Stacking

Jennifer Lynch suggests your organization stack your projects.

Standish Definition of The Good Mate Acceptance

Acceptance is the ability to have mutual influence, accept compromise to overcome gridlock, and nurture common ...

Standish Definition of The Good Mate Influence

Being influential means you have the power to shape how team members feel and act concerning the...

Surveys

Jennifer Lynch suggests the third step of your project research should be surveys using the dezider.com,

Team Size

Jennifer Lynch suggests that team size is one of the most important aspects in the agile process.

The Ten Faces of Innovation

Jennifer Lynch suggests that team persona diversity is a must as much as skills diversity.

Togetherness

Jennifer Lynch suggests there is a vast difference between having a group of individuals work on a project and having teamwork on a project. 

Toxic Activity

Jennifer Lynch suggests that activity can often turn a toxic person. 

Training Commitment

Jennifer Lynch suggests that you have commitment to training.

Tuned In

Jennifer Lynch suggests that focusing on user needs is really hard.

Up-to-date Information

Jennifer Lynch suggests in order to be objective you must have correct and up-to-date information.

Vocabulary

Jennifer Lynch suggests using a common vocabulary

 

Yes or No?

Jennifer Lynch suggests knowing when to say yes or no: is an essential element of leadership.